Archive for the ‘culture’ Category

Our small town in Wisconsin creates sports posters for the various varsity teams. The themes for the posters change each year and they are fascinating snapshots of the team for that season while showcasing threads of the overall team culture.

The phrase chosen by the soccer boys for their high school poster this year was “Our work is the world’s game”.

MHS_Soccer 2017 proof

They wanted the phrase iterated in three languages to represent the cultures of boys who play in our program. This year we have a foreign exchange student from Brazil, an exchange student from Turkey and several boys from the local Hmong community. Because of the diversity within our team, the phrase was translated into Portugese, Turkish and Hmong. It is certainly a unique poster among those posted around town.

In all fairness though, we are a unique program. That uniqueness has challenged me in ways I hadn’t anticipated as a coach and, in the current climate of our country, learning to navigate that uniqueness well may be one of the most important things I’ll ever do in my life.

In a town traditionally known for farming and championship football teams, the soccer micro-culture has been marginalized. I am challenged by that reality. I coach a high school boys’ soccer team that plays the same season as football and, in all honesty, the field is slanted in favor of the dominant football culture. It’s not a ground-breaking observation, I know, but I am starting to sense I need to pursue a better way to co-exist.

There is a well-established football machine in this town. (dare I say in this country) It’s a powerful vehicle of discipline for the athletes and entertainment for the spectators. There is good in that. I did not grow up in a town where Friday-night football was an entire-town event or so big that literally everyone’s schedules revolve around what the football boys are doing. For some time, I admit, I have postured for battle against the machine, hoping to woo some of the better multi-sport athletes to choose soccer instead of football. It’s not a battle I have won.

Soccer encourages regular creativity and it is time I employ skills I have spent my lifetime honing.

I grew up thinking soccer was what everyone did: boys or girls, tall or short, and the coaches on the sideline added to my understanding that this world is a pretty big place. My youth coaches were from Iran, France and England and I appreciated the varying perspectives they added to my appreciation of the game. (and of the world at large) I want to create a space where that thinking exists for the players and families who explore soccer in this town.

I am not intent on tearing down anything the football culture has created. I enjoy watching football and I appreciate the efforts of the athletes who pad up on Friday nights. They bring the entire town together and I like that. My focus needs to shift to a mode of appreciating football for football and establishing soccer for what it can be in this community. I am sensing that we need to work at expanding soccer without diminishing anything already happening on the football field.

Maybe our poster phrase is more important than I think. The woman helping me to translate our slogan into Hmong was challenged by the word “game”. There are two Hmong words for game with different connotations. One has to do with childlike playing and the other has to do with game competition. She chose the word that meant competition. It’s the right word for this year’s poster.

The world is playing an incredibly competitive game right now, deciding whether dominant culture or inclusion is the way to go. It is an age-old battle that seems to have been a part of the human experience since the beginning of time. What is emerging in my little Western Wisconsin corner of the world is an effort of advocating for the marginalized while appreciating the dominant. Only time will tell how this will go, but I am a part of this team’s culture and I too want to make the world’s game my work.

Meagan is currently the head boys soccer coach at Menomonie High School in Menomonie, Wisconsin. She played collegiate soccer for Division I Colorado College and has been the coach of U5 through college teams for nearly twenty years.

Copyright Choosing to Grow 2017                                     www.meaganfrank.com                                                                             @choosingtogrow

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